Employment and Migration Blog

Calling the boss a bastard

Posted by Stephen Booth on 12 Sep 2011

Surely that's OK, if I do it in my own time from my own computer with the maximum privacy settings and only to a select group of 70?

 

Not when the comments are particularly offensive, and the group includes 11 work colleagues, even when the employee has the sensitivity to block the access of the relevant boss.

 

In yet another Facebook-induced termination, an employee followed the good old Australian tradition of "calling the boss a bastard" by posting comments on Facebook complaining about errors paying commission. The boss in question didn't see the posting, but she soon heard about it (so the group was leaky as well as select - you just can't trust those cyber friends, can you?).

 

The posting included "how the ---- work can be so ------- useless ... ----- are going down tomorrow" - no names, but it was plain who was being attacked.

 

FWA held that even without all the right policies being in place (as they were), it was common sense that it was not OK to publish aggressive and insulting comments about another employee.

 

Seems right to me: the surprising thing is that the employee thought it was not only OK, but worth running a full unfair dismissal case to try to prove it!